Why didn’t I get more new patients

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Why didn’t I get more new patients

In my last post, we looked at the “5 Biggest Questions About Chiropractic Ads“. But due to length, we only got through 4 questions and answers. So today’s post is the 5th and final question we get asked most from buyers of my ads kit. And it’s probably the most important question to get the answer for.

The question comes in various forms, but it goes something like this, “I ran your ad and want to know why we didn’t get more new patients?”

Now, as you might realize, this is a hard question for me to answer. Mainly because I don’t know how many new patients he did actually get. And how many did he expect to get from the ad?

What’s a good number, 10, 15, 20? I know expectations have been elevated to unrealistic numbers in chiropractic. What else can we expect after years of hyped up marketing strategies that said they would give us 100 new patients every time we ran them, or make us $1 million a month the first month!

Don’t get me wrong, my ads work well to bring in new patients and I don’t think they’re over-hyped. We even give a guarantee for those who aren’t happy. But I can say right now it’s unlikely you’ll get 80 new patients every time you run them. Maybe if you’re in a small town with no other chiros, but as for the rest of us we’ll gladly take 10-30 new patients each run.

But what’s strange is when we get an email of a doctor who’s actually doing very well, ‘making a killin’ actually, but he didn’t get “as many as he expected”.

For example, once I was told by a doctor they had received 5 decompression patients from one of my ads. This doctor knows that other doctors are getting 15-25 decompression patients per ad, so his question would have been a good one if he was asking “how do I get as many as those other guys do”. But alas, we rarely get that question asked of us. Instead, this doc was saying that 5 new patients just wasn’t enough. After all, he had paid $1000 to run the ad.

But hold on a second. We’re looking at this scenario completely backwards! Let me explain…

I asked him if all of the 5 started care. He said yes. I asked how much his care plans were priced at. He said $3000. Quick math lead me to determine he got $15,000 back on his investment. What was his investment? Cost of $1000 to run the ad.

That’s a 15-to-1 return on investment! Who wouldn’t like a 15:1 ROI?

There are very few businesses anywhere that get that kind of return. But this doctor was bummed that he only got 5 new patients in for $1000 spent. Do you see where the premises are wrong with this kind of thinking?

You cannot measure an ads success solely by the number of new patients it brought in. And you certainly can’t measure it’s success by how much money you spent. It’s your return on investment that matters. The money spent (ad cost) is only used to figure out the ROI.

Think about it this way…

What if a new patient come into your office with an 11 out of 10 (!) on the pain scale. They got their first treatment, looked at you angrily and said “I’m not happy doctor. I paid you all that money and only got a 60% reduction in my pain today!” After picking your jaw up off the floor, you’d kindly remind the patient of how they are were doing when that crawled into your office on their hands and knees. Therefore, you’re telling them to compare the “before” to the “after”, which is essentially their return on investment. How much they spent doesn’t directly have anything to do with how much better they got.

Are you measuring your ROI?

It’s simple to do really. Take all the new patients who come in from the ad and record their name in a spreadsheet. Then keep track of how much money each one spends in your office. Your patient accounting software should make this number easily accessible.

So your spreadsheet might look something like the one to the left here.

If I hadn’t kept this spreadsheet and tracked every patient, I might try and rely on my memory of how the ad performed. And think, “man, that ad really sucked because Antonio never started care, and Maria she didn’t even come back after the exam. Bah, advertising doesn’t work!”

But the truth is I got a 2061% ROI, or a 20-to-1 return! You can bet I’m running this ad again after seeing how well it really did. (And this ad is actually in the Ultimate Chiropractic Ads.)

So start tracking your ads. Not using “memory” tracking, where you just try and remember how well it did. But actually record the numbers and see what the real story is.

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3 Comments

  1. This is so true! As a profession we need to STOP looking at “how many” new patients we get from our marketing, but instead START looking more at what our ROI is! End of story.

  2. I couldn’t agree more. I ran an ad recently that cost me $1400.00 and brought in 8 new patients. I had them come to a work shop for new patients, which resulted in 4 more. I have a $3000.00 case average, so my ROI is AWESOME. My advise to other chiropractors is continue to run good solid ads…. It will pay off

  3. All business people look at ROI when they decide if an investment is good and it is good that we bring this mindset to our profession too. Pure focus on number of new patients can lead us astray.

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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.